Energetic Supporters

Boosters

Booster [boo-ster]

noun

  1. a person or thing that boosts, especially an energetic and enthusiastic supporter.

Football teams have Boosters.

Schools have Boosters.

Can churches have Boosters?

Jesus had Boosters.  Mary and Martha were two of his favorites.  “Now as they were traveling along, He entered a village; and a woman named Martha welcomed Him into her home.  She had a sister called Mary, who was seated at the Lord’s feet, listening to His word.” Luke 10:38-29 NASB

The apostle Paul had Boosters.  Rufus and his mother who was like a mother to Paul were just two of Paul’s many Boosters. “Greet Rufus, a choice man in the Lord, also his mother and mine.” Romans 16:13 NIV

Surely then a local church can have Boosters who are enthusiastic supporters in the community that can help get the word out about the ministries of the church and contribute in many ways to the life of the church.

Boosterville is a program that allows non profit groups like local churches to encourage their “Boosters” to make purchases from participating Boosterville businesses, such as restaurants, hair salons, pet groomers, bookstores, coffee shops and more. In return, these businesses share back a small portion of those purchases directly to the nonprofit group designated by the buyer.

Recently, a check was presented at the Indiana Annual Conference for the money Bethel UMC Boosters in Indianapolis raised during their first month of using Boosterville.  They’ve used Boosterville to support fellowship outside of the church by sending members to gather at a local pizza place to raise money as a group.

Does your church have Boosters who are ready to participate?

When it all comes together

Steeple

Churches and their communities have worked together in ministry for a very long time.  Church outreach and community needs have blended to provide resources and spiritual support for the people they serve.

Local churches oftentimes find that the needs of the community stretch their resources.  Many church leaders are constantly being creative and innovative in the ways they provide service.  There is a long list of opportunities to raise funds for local church ministries.  Using the steeples is one way to do it.

Churches are looking for ways to support ministries even in this technologically advanced environment. In order to carry out the ministry of Jesus in their communities, several churches around the country have used their church buildings to house cellular towers within their steeples to bring in much needed revenue for the expansion of the Kingdom of God.

This provides an income source for the church and a needed communications piece for the community.  Steeplecom, a vetted sponsor of GCFA, is a company that provides services to local churches to navigate through the maze of telecommunications contracts.  If you want more information about Steeplecom, visit their site: www.steeplecom.com/umc.

Whether it’s hosting a community meeting on the needs of children in the area, church services for members and visitors, or bible study, local churches all raise funds to support their ministries.  It all comes together for the good of the church, the community, and the people engaged in ministry.

Make giving a cheerful experience for your congregation

Cheerful giver

A guest blog from Vanco Payments Solutions

Jan Jasmin, SVP, Charitable Giving Evangelist

We often hear or say that God loves a cheerful giver (2 Corinthians 9:7).

Many of us draw satisfaction from simply making a gift, but others are looking for a deeper understanding of what their gifts help the church accomplish. Is there more that church leaders can do to make giving an experience that your congregation goes about cheerfully?

A good place to start is looking at giving from the givers’ perspective. It’s important to them to understand why you need their gifts, and that they can give them in a way that’s familiar and convenient to them. Answering both of those needs can help your members give more often and more generously.

Here are a few simple steps you can take to update your giving program and make it a cheerful experience for your congregation:

Talk openly about money.

You won’t surprise your congregation or make them feel uncomfortable by talking about money. Quite the opposite is true ¾ they want to know how you use their pledges and offerings to make a positive impact through your ministry, and they want to know how much you’ll need so they can plan their giving budgets to help.

Encourage generosity by showing how your church has changed lives.

Let your congregation know what your outreach ministries are doing to help the community. Share their successes and let your members know how much their financial help brought them to fruition.

Summarize your plans for making a positive impact on your community.

It’s not enough to tell your congregation what you’ve done. You also need to share your plans for the future. Your strategy for keeping your church active in the community may be the thing that excites your congregation and leads them to cheerfully contribute.

Do everything you can to make it easy to give.

Your congregation needs multiple ways to respond when you ask them to give. Some members will only give when the plate is passed. A steadily growing number of others almost never carry cash or a checkbook, but always have debit and credit cards and a smartphone. A mix of electronic giving options like online, mobile, text and kiosk will help them respond when they want with the method or methods that they prefer.

Watch what happens next.

Take these steps and keep a close eye on your outcomes. You may be surprised at how cheerfully your congregation responds and by the increase in funding your ministry receives when you empower their generosity.

White paper: How to Create a Sustainable Ministry

Our white paper, Electronic Giving’s Role in Creating a Sustainable Ministry, has tips about creating a successful fundraising strategy for church leaders who want to help their congregations give cheerfully.

[Download Now]

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At Vanco, we’re committed to making a difference for our clients, and those they serve. We strive to listen, be helpful, earn trust and deliver what’s needed in accordance with the values that define us. If you have questions or would like to learn more about Give+,  visit vancopayments.com/giveplus-um,  or call us at 800-675-7430.

 

The United Methodist Connection at Work

EZRA Connection

We each serve a role in the life of our local church.  Every role is important.  We are thankful for each member and visitor – new or old – who contributes to the life and vitality of the church.

Parts of the work of the church require organization.  We work hard to keep up with membership, organizations, activities and functions of the church.  However it is done, organization of our information is a vital part of the ministry of administration.  That is why GCFA developed Ezra, the official database of The United Methodist Church, and provides access to the United Methodist connection with information contained in Ezra.  (Par. 807.16)

EZRA

Ezra is the dynamic, one-stop location for United Methodist data.  It is a robust, interactive, and cost-effective data solution that uses web-based technology to be available in real time.

As an example of its use, the East Ohio conference has used Ezra since 2009. The conference uses the churches, people, leadership and statistics module in the life of its eleven offices.  It has helped to cut down on multiple reporting of changes in vital personal information and allows for the reporting of church data electronically. Submission of data doesn’t involve formatting a spreadsheet!  A local church dashboard allows congregations to input their own leadership information.

For the East Ohio conference, Ezra is the centralized, interactive database accessed from any location at any time via an internet connection helping East Ohio to be more organized from the conference office to the district offices to each member or visitor of a local church.  Work efficiencies are realized and more resources are available to do more ministry at all levels of the conference.

Customization and excellent customer service are two reasons East Ohio is a satisfied customer.  They have made Ezra an application they can use easily across the conference.

Effective deployment of services that help the full range of administrative ministries is at the core of the mission of GCFA.  We want to thank ALL the conferences and local churches that use GCFA Shared Services.  Feel free to contact us if you have questions about any of our Shared Services.

Monday Meditation – Change Is Hard

Changes Ahead

All of us have probably gone through or are going through a change.  Some we hate, some we enjoy, some we fear, others we don’t know what to feel or think about.  It is in these times of change that we see who we are and not just who we say we are. We have a chance to ask some critical questions in the midst of change. Who are you during these times?  What is your attitude?  What are your values?  What is your faith?

The UMC is going through changes.

Has been for a couple of decades.  But that is to be expected.  As new generations come through our doors, they bring their own influences and sensibilities.  A grandmother listens to the preacher, assuming he’s telling the truth to the best of his knowledge.  Her grandson is checking out what the pastor is saying on his tablet or cellphone, making sure of the minister’s accuracy through online resources.  He also maybe looking up opposing arguments.

What is the change we want to see in our denomination?  What does God want to change about us?  What is God already changing in UM churches all over the world?

Jesus knew exactly who he was and went about being the change he wanted to see, the Kingdom of God here among his people. Mark 1:15

He wasn’t like Grumpy Cat in this picture.  “There’s only 2 things I don’t like.  Change and the way things are.” says Grumpy.  Jesus was the change He wanted done on earth as it is in heaven.

Grumpy Cat

Dear God, Show us how to change into what we are to be next.  Help us recognize and live faithfully as nothing stays the same.  Change is inevitable but need not be unenviable.  Turn our hearts toward you and your ministry here on earth. Amen.

Monday Meditation – Touch

Touch

The Spirit of the Sovereign Lord is on me,
    because the Lord has anointed me
    to proclaim good news to the poor.
He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted,
    to proclaim freedom for the captives
    and release from darkness for the prisoners, (Isaiah 61:1  NIV)

Jesus healed the sick by touching them and restoring them to their communities. The priests only wanted money for sacrifices to be made in order for one to be allowed to rejoin one’s family and community.  They wanted to be paid in order to make one ritually “pure” again.

Miracles

Big miracles like the virgin birth and the resurrection just don’t happen in my life with too much frequency.  But many miracles Jesus performed every day, like touching someone in need, often those who no one would touch.  I’ve seen such love, I know it can happen.  I just don’t see it enough.  Touch is an incredible miracle.  Because without it none of the others would matter.  Even one’s weak faith did not disqualify you from receiving Jesus’ touch.

A touch.  The compassion of one man willing to break all the rules to touch you at your lowest.  It doesn’t have to be physical, it can be spiritually.  But both together are so powerful.

Dear Lord, Your Son came to touch and heal us.  Let us follow His lead and reach out to those nobody wants to touch.  Grant us courage to do so.  Amen.

Monday Meditation – Melting Pot?

Melting Pot

The phrase “melting pot” came into general usage after the presentation of the 1908 play of the same name came out.  It was used as a metaphor to describe the United States.  The US was seen as a fusion of nationalities, cultures and ethnicities, a homogeneous society in spite of its diverse immigration patterns.

But those who know cooking understand that when you put items such as spices, meats, broth etc. into a pot, the food does not “melt” together but mixes with the rest to strike up combinations that are hopefully very tasty!

The oil, ghee, cumin seeds, ginger root, garam masala and tumeric I mix and heat up in a pan, don’t become less than what each began, but instead are enhanced by the other flavors and retains its own to help the other ingredients taste even more delicious.

This is what America has become – a stew pot of all kinds of ingredients. Added together, they season the entire meal with so many different, interesting and tasty flavors.

This is what the church must become.  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., said the most segregated hour in the US is Sunday morning at church time.  Unfortunately, for most churches this remain true.  Some have managed to overcome segregation environment, but many remain homogenous communities usually within very heterogeneous neighborhoods.

But like the Apostle Paul wrote, the church is made up of all different kinds of parts. (1 Corinthians 12)  If one is missing it stresses the whole body.  The organism can survive and live, perhaps even thrive but at what cost?

Dear God, you created each of us in your own image.  Help us to live as one body with Christ as our head.  Let us see diversity as you do, as a strength and not as a burden.  Help us to cook with all your children in the kitchen, knowing that for once too many cooks can’t spoil the pot!  Amen.

Monday Meditation – A Historical Connection for Building the Kingdom of God

Connectional Giving Blog

In second Corinthians 8:1-5 (NIV), Paul tells us of the extreme generosity of the Macedonian church.  It wasn’t out of abundance and peace that they gave but during strife and poverty they found ways to give financially to the church.

In verses 13-15, we have an understanding of the connection that was built between the Macedonian, Corinthian and Jerusalem churches.

“At the present time your plenty will supply what they need, so that in turn their plenty will supply what you need. The goal is equality” (NIV)

When one had plenty they were asked to give to those who needed.  Just as it would be returned to them when the other had plenty.

Now Paul set up some parameters to this giving.

  1. There is a genuine holy need. The Jerusalem church shouldn’t be hoarding the money either but using it toward ministry.  The Jerusalem church, being in a city, had many widows, the elderly, visitors and orphans in need of assistance and who needed care.
  2. Giving is interdependent. The financial support is given by everyone no matter how small a donation it may be.  The Macedonian and Corinthian churches shared in the support of the Jerusalem church.
  3. Giving is reciprocal. Even if the Corinth church was never without funds, the Jerusalem church could give to it once it was able to, in support of the Corinthian ministries.
  4. The gift is given for the furthering of the Kingdom of God.

“We want to avoid any criticism of the way we administer this liberal gift.  For we are taking pains to do what is right, not only in the eyes of the Lord but also in the eyes of man.” (verses 20-21)

Being in connection is relevant to us now as well.

Methodists have a connection.  Each church is connected to another so that when a need arises, all can help lift those who are struggling with the challenges life brings.

We give so that others might be able to share the Kingdom of God with this world.  We give so that those sharing the Kingdom of God have the tools and skills necessary to make disciples of all nations.  We give to improve the lives of our fellow human beings because we have been called by our God to do so.

Therefore show these men the proof of your love and the reason for our pride in you, so that the churches can see it. (verse 24)

Almighty God, show us your love for each of us so that we might see everyone as our brothers and sisters in Christ, your beloved. Amen.

Monday Meditation – Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit

Blasphemy

It seems one can blaspheme the Holy Spirit and commit an eternal sin, one that will never be forgiven.

What is this unforgivable sin?

Juan Luis Segundo writes, “What is not pardonable is using theology to turn real human liberation into something odious.” (1979, Frontiers of Theology in Latin America, p 240ff.)

In other words, calling the work of the Holy Spirit evil.

The context of this sin is within the story of the Pharisees addressing Jesus as possessed by Beelzebub.  They were saying that in fact, Jesus was driving out demons by the power of Satan.

Yet Jesus is liberating people from not only their demonic oppression but also their spiritual and cultural oppression.  He freed the people from ritual restraints on them in order for them to lead a life outside of the rules and regulations of the Temple priests and pharisaical laws.  Laws which had become vile themselves despite having begun with the best of intentions when handed down to Moses from God.  Laws used to trap people in poverty and outsider status.

What Jesus was doing by calling out the evil done in the name of God was not blasphemy.  But calling what Jesus did as evil was blasphemy.  Jesus’ liberation of people, His freeing of people in the name of God was a true act of the Holy Spirit.  The priests’ and Pharisees’ need to control people through the law was blasphemy.  Not because of order but because it masqueraded as the word of God and restricted people into “pure” and “impure” states according to their ability to pay for the cleansing rituals and sacrifices.  This was not what God intended.

Instead of freeing people, the religious authorities straightjacketed them with the law in order to gain from them financially.

Dear Holy Spirit come and illuminate the world for us.  Help us to see Your movement in the world.  Help us to know Your liberating power in our world.  Expose for us the hypocrisy we live with day in and day out in our lives.  Help us to see what is evil and what is not, and to know the works of our Lord and the works of the Enemy.  Amen.

Power of the Connection – Working with Africa University

AU & GCFA

Last October, a team from GCFA’s Shared Services and IT departments traveled to Africa University (AU) for a week to perform an IT assessment and look for ways to strengthen the Church’s global ministries.  This was all in response to contacts and conversations during the 2016 General Conference.  The power of connection!  AU wanted us to work together on their technology and see how we might be able to collaborate to improve the work done at AU.

Working with AU is an opportunity to bring cost savings and efficiencies to others throughout the connection, regardless of their location.  We are continually looking for  solutions that will serve our church wherever we are or are planning to be. For example, this year, GCFA will employ a Shared Services Manager to focus on the Central Conferences.  The position will be based on the African continent. We are listening to the desires of our church and delegates from the central conferences and are implementing an out-of-the-box approach to seek global solutions.

Competing on a Global Stage

AU is looking to modernize its technology in ways that will help students succeed and show that AU can compete with other schools on the global stage. For GCFA, this is an opportunity to focus on the work within our connection in the central conferences.  We are focusing our efforts in the 2016 quadrennium on ensuring that our work and actions are serving the global church.

During the visit, we met with many wonderful people at the university.  We interacted with the faculty, the students, the Vice Chancellor, and all of his staff.  We spent the most time with Richard Fotsin, the Director of Information Communications Technology and his team.  We learned a lot about how things work in Africa and much about the culture and plans for the future.

AU-GCFA Staff

In addition to the Africa University staff, the GCFA staff included Michael Dunn, Network Engineer, and Stephen Pace, Data Center Engineer, Dale Owens, Application Development Manager, Derek Preston, Director of IT Infrastructure, and Shannon Lavrin, Senior Shared Services Manager.

The thing we love most about Africa, and Zimbabwe and AU specifically, are the people. John Calipari, University of Kentucky’s basketball coach, was recently stated that all of his success comes down to one thing – relationships.  For him, he said, nothing is more important.  We believe that the relationships we have and will continue to build through this partnership, speak to the power of the UMC’s connection.